Euro first for Case

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The first sale in Europe of Case’s Stage V excavator range has been made to a long-term customer in England.

The CX90D was sold by dealer Dennis Barnfield to Civils & Construction Solutions (C&CS) to be used in its road and sewer operations. Phil Barnes, managing director at C&CS, said: “Having used CASE machines for 27 years, we were delighted to add the CX90D to our fleet – our fourth brand new machine in the last 12 months.

“We’re proud to have the first CASE machine sold in Europe with the new Stage V engine. The cooperation and help from all involved has made adjusting to the new engine regulations quick and easy, something that we have all really appreciated.”

Introduction of Stage V engines across the manufacturer’s European range has been driven by the new EU emissions standards introduced in January which dictate a new limit for particle number (PN) and a reduced limit for particle matter (PM) in the emissions from any non-road mobile machinery below 56 kW. Larger machines will need to be manufactured to meet Stage V legislation next year.

“The Yanmar Stage V engine used in the CX90D is the most powerful in the segment. As well as meeting the legislation requirements, we also deliver 20% more power with a 4.5% decrease in fuel usage,” explained Sandro Vitale, product director for general construction.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 26/6/2019

Morris Leslie in £36m deal

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Morris Leslie Plant Hire has given its biggest-ever telehandler order to JCB. The £36m deal for 555 Loadalls from six metres up to 20 metres was placed through dealer Scot JCB.

Graham Ogilvie, managing director at the Perthshire-headquartered hire business, said: “As the construction market continues to develop, Morris Leslie is experiencing excellent company growth. These JCB Loadalls ensure our customers get the best of all worlds – high performing machines with excellent telematic reporting and a great nationwide dealer support network.”

The Morris Leslie Group now runs more than 5,000 machines, with an average age of under two years.  Founder Morris Leslie said: “We are delighted to have placed an order of this magnitude with JCB as our relationship continues to grow in line with the expansion of our business.”

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Pictured at JCB World Headquarters are (from left), Morris Leslie; Yvette Henshall-Bell, JCB’s managing director for global key accounts; Graham Ogilvie; and David Park, sales director at Scot JCB.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 7/6/2019

The Station Master

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More than 95% of the demolition material produced during the £120m redevelopment of Glasgow’s Queen Street station has been recycled, with thousands of tonnes being used on housing and road building projects in the city.

Around 14,000 tonnes of redundant material have been removed, although amounts of brick and concrete have been crushed and re-used as part of the base layer for the new station. The only materials not considered for recycling were those containing hazardous substances such as asbestos.

Queen Street is being rebuilt to accommodate longer, greener electric trains and Dem-Master was appointed for the phased asbestos removal and structural demolition on the Network Rail scheme. “As a team we had to work to an extremely challenging integrated programme which involved working above and around the third busiest train station in Scotland, which approximately 47,000 people access and egress daily,” said a Dem-Master spokesman.

The station and its access to George Square, Queen Street low level trains and the subway system remained open at all times. The main focal point of the demolition, which formed the south-west corner of the station, was a multi-storey office building and its annexe extension at the junction of West George Street and Dundas Street. Because of the constantly evolving station environment, flexibility in working sequence and methodology was essential to maintain the continuity of work and to remain on programme.

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The heavy team.

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“The project had an extensive library of methodology and risk assessments, said Dem-Master. “Each operation on site had to be pre-planned and for this reason the appropriate method and associated risks had to be selected and inserted for that week or day’s operation. This meant that it was essential that we had project managers full time on site adjusting and amending the constant flow of information between Dem-Master and our clients.”

Such a continuous approval process had to be sustained throughout the project. As any important changes occurred on site, the written plan then had to be amended accordingly.

Measures to ensure the safety of the public included deconstruction with full height access scaffold and a shrink wrap enclosure while noise and vibration were monitored continuously. The adjacent Millennium Hotel extension was ‘divorced’ by hand in advance of machine demolition operations.

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The listed station roof.

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Tommy McPake, Network Rail’s programme manager for Queen Street, said: “Demolishing the redundant building in the heart of Glasgow city centre, and without closing the station, was extremely challenging for the project team.”

The Scottish Government-funded redevelopment will be completed in 2020. A new glass-fronted concourse, almost double the size of the existing space, is being built to accommodate predicted increases in passenger numbers, and platforms two to five are being extended out towards George Square, taking up most of the space covered by the train shed roof.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 5/6/2019

First Hyundai 90-tonner

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The first Hyundai 90-tonne HX900L sold in Europe has gone into service with a UK demolition contractor.

The machine is carrying a 10-tonne Fortress shear and was also supplied with a 4.85 m³ bucket for excavating. Customer ABLE UK has put it into operation on the north-east coast of England where it is shearing metal to size for recycling.

Negotiations with Cumbria-based dealer Taylor & Braithwaite on price and cost took five months from initial enquiry to delivery on site.

Chris Jordan, sales manager at the dealership, said there were several new enquiries for the HX900L following the deal with ABLE. “We are anticipating more orders in the near future.”

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 6/6/2019

I&H Brown starts clearing

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The civil engineering division of I&H Brown has won a major contract at one of the biggest community projects in the UK.

The project is the first for a new client, Winchburgh Developments, and calls for extensive site clearance, excavation of 52,000 cub. metres of topsoils and subsoils to create a platform for housing development, construction of new roads, footways and drainage and installation of services into the site. In addition, 15 boreholes will be grouted and a temporary shared access road constructed.

The master plan for the site, 14 miles west of Edinburgh, is for at least 3,450 homes, improved transport links, schools and new outdoor spaces.

Brown’s programme for phase 7A of the development is 30 weeks with a return visit next year for 10 weeks.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 3/6/2019

Volvo’s new 20-tonner

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Volvo has launched a new contender into the competitive 20-tonne excavator market.

The EC200E slots between the EC220E and EC180E models and has the Stage V-certified D4 Volvo engine.

“The EC200E is an extremely versatile machine, one that is able to carry out many tasks for a variety of applications. By combining the EC200E with tailor-made Volvo attachments, customers can make the most out of the machine – maximising efficiency, hence profitability,” said the company.

In a design ‘first’ for its mid-sized machines, the new model is now easier to access from the right-hand side (pictured), thanks to a new step welded to the undercarriage and a three-point handrail above it.

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. . . and Gow goes wide

♦ Recent Volvo customers in Scotland include Thurso-based Gow Groundworks which has added its second specially-converted EC140E LM excavator.

The widespread model will operate on Gow’s ground working and general contracting applications and the LGP conversion by Central Engineering Ltd allows it to carry 1400mm track pads in areas requiring ultra-low ground bearing pressure, such as in peat bogs, or to revert to the standard 750mm.

Other features include Steelwrist tiltrotator and high visibility livery.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 4/6/2019

Diesel days are numbered

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6,000 litres saved on rail job

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A rail renewal project has achieved a 97% ‘diesel-free’ operation by using solar and battery power.

The joint Network Rail and Colas Rail scheme used technology from Prolectric Ltd instead of diesel generators to save 6,000 litres of fuel and more than 15 tonnes of CO2 during a 14-day project centred around a 72-hour possession.

Results of the project at Llanwern in South Wales are said to mark an “environmental milestone” in the drive for carbon-free, off-grid working. Network Rail wants to reduce non-traction energy consumption by almost 20% and carbon emissions by 25% by 2024.

Nick Matthews, Network Rail’s programme engineering manager, explained: “In business improvement, generally a one or two per cent gain is considered significant, so to achieve 97% at the first attempt is simply staggering. Saving close to 6,000 litres of diesel is the same as driving a family car at 40 mpg twice around the circumference of the world.

“It’s also very clear where we have learnt the lessons from Llanwern so we can close that small gap. We really want to get to that 100% fuel free-figure by the time of our next challenge, planned for a rail renewal project later in the summer.”

Solar lighting and power generation was used across the 21-acre site on access roads, the welfare cabin area, car parking and the track working area itself. The project spanned a period of 14 days leading up to and following a 72-hour possession, with more than 70 rail staff employed on site.

Three 25kW solar generators replaced conventional diesel generators providing light and heat for seven welfare cabins used for site offices, a canteen, toilets and drying room.

A total of 21 solar tower lights illuminated the site compound, car parking and work preparation areas, as well as being deployed on the trackside, where 200 metres of battery-powered link lighting was also used and column street lights were positioned along the access road to the site.

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Lighting-up time.

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Matthews continued: “It was just as important to explore and extend the range of renewable applications, including a new solar-powered camera security system. We were also able to demonstrate the versatility of using portable lithium battery packs, recharged as necessary from the solar generators to power dust suppression systems, water cooler stations and point motors.”

Using diesel generators to support rail renewal work has been the only option for reliable off-grid power. Now solar technology is being seen as a vital contribution to non-traction carbon targets, at the same time reducing the noise, smell and air pollution from diesel exhausts, especially next to residential areas.

“The environmental impact of running diesel generators all day on a major worksite like Llanwern is absolutely huge,” Matthews went on. “It’s not just about carbon emissions; our lineside neighbours are very important to us. By using solar harvesting, we’re not polluting their environment with unwelcome fumes and noise.”

Ryan Ballinger, production manager for Colas Rail, added: “We have worked closely to drive the development of suitable on-site solar tower lights and walking lights. Now at Llanwern we have been able to add solar generators for the first time and moving forward we want to add smaller plant and tools such as disk saws and band saws.

“There’s no doubt these technologies are going to be a complete game changer. Now, we need to push on and get to the point where they are just business as usual.”

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 3/6/2019

Quarry death firm fined

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A quarry company has been fined £150,000 after an employee was found fatally injured beside a dump truck.

Northern Ireland firm FP McCann pleaded guilty to two breaches of health and safety legislation following an incident in 2015 at its quarry near Magherafelt. Belfast Crown Court heard the vehicle had no parking brake, no emergency steering and no working seat belt.

Victor Nicholl, (62), had worked for the company for 19 years and had been moving material from a crushing and screening plant to a stockpile area. The vehicle was found stationary with the wheels lodged in the edge protection along the haul road and Mr Nicholl was lying beside one of the front wheels with fatal head injuries.

Anne Boylan, principal inspector at the Health & Safety Executive in Northern Ireland, said: “The vehicle that Mr Nicholl was driving on the day of the incident had not been maintained in a safe condition and was not fit for use in a hazardous environment such as a quarry.”

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 3/6/2019

Operators in slimming regime

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Plant operators will have to excavate narrower trenches under new rules launched by the Scottish Government.

A national code of practice that comes into effect this week will see the standardisation of faster and more modern techniques for digging utilities trenches. It is designed to better manage road works and to accelerate the installation of fibre broadband.

“The development of more compact cables has seen modern techniques, such as requiring narrower holes and less excavation required, increasing the speed of delivery,” said a Government spokesman. “The technique also safeguards the roads by reducing the need for return visits to repair failed trenches.”

The new approach should mean mean shorter periods of disruption for power, water and gas works who use the technique.

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Digging trenches on a Virgin Media site.

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Connectivity minister Paul Wheelhouse said the Government had listened to companies who said slimmer trenching could help deliver fibre broadband faster and with less disruption to communities. “We understand that utility companies operate in a competitive market. They are therefore constantly looking for ways to improve their efficiency and to reduce their costs in order to keep ahead of their competition. This has led to innovation in how infrastructure, such as broadband, is deployed.

“We have updated the code to enable narrow trenching to take place consistently and in a manner which protects our pavements and road network, and this has the added benefit that will result in the faster deployment of broadband across Scotland and a reduction in the disruption communities face during the roll-out itself.”

Narrow trenching is defined as any trench less than 300mm wide, commonly used to install small pieces of apparatus such as fibre cables.

The Code of Practice comes into force immediately.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 3/6/2019

AB2000 in van deal

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AB2000 is replacing more than half of its 50-strong van fleet with new vehicles. It’s the first time the Glasgow-based company – acquired last year by the Quattro Group – has contract hired its fleet.

Fleet services company Fraikin won the order after supplying more than 150 vans to Quattro Group in 2017. The full-service agreement with AB2000, Scotland’s largest privately-owned hirer of operated plant, is for 31 Mercedes-Benz Citan vans for delivery to sites in Aberdeen, Glasgow and Inverness. Specification includes air conditioning, forward-facing cameras and reversing aids.

Fraikin’s online web portal, FraikinView, will provide transparency for all vehicle maintenance matters including defect reporting, progress of vehicle breakdowns, and important vehicle documentation.

Jon Sherred, Quattro’s area manager, said: “FraikinView has transformed the way we manage our fleet and naturally we wanted our colleagues at AB2000 to share in these benefits.

“These vehicles were previously purchased outright but moving to contract hire allows us to take advantage of fixed monthly pricing for the next four years. We know exactly how much we’re paying each month, which makes planning fleet replacement intervals a whole lot simpler.”

All negotiations with Mercedes-Benz were handled by Fraikin, allowing the plant hirer to take advantage of the group’s international buying power.

Vans will be on the road up to six days a week and cover up to 30,000 miles a year.

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©Scottish Plant.  Article posted 30/5/2019